ADAS Applications

Significant automotive safety improvements in the past (e.g., shatter-resistant glass, three-point seatbelts, airbags) were passive safety measures designed to minimize injury during an accident. Today, ADAS systems actively improve safety with the help of embedded vision reducing the occurrence of accidents and injury to occupants.

The implementation of cameras in the vehicle involves a new AI ​​function that uses sensor fusion to identify and process objects. Sensor fusion, similar to the human brain process information, combines large amounts of data with the help of image recognition software, ultrasound sensors, lidar, and radar. This technology can physically respond faster than a human driver ever could. It can analyze streaming video in real time, recognize what the video shows, and determine how to react to it.

Some of the most common ADAS applications are:

 

1. Adaptive Cruise Control

Adaptive cruise control (ACC) is particularly helpful on the highway, where drivers can find it difficult to monitor their speed and other cars over a long period of time. Advanced cruise control can automatically accelerate, slow down, and at times stop the vehicle, depending on the action’s other objects in the immediate area.

 

2. Glare-Free High Beam and Pixel Light

Glare-free high beam and pixel light uses sensors to adjust to darkness and the vehicle’s surroundings without disturbing oncoming traffic. This new headlight application detects the lights of other vehicles and redirects the vehicle’s lights away to prevent other road users from being temporarily blinded. 

 

3. Adaptive Light Control

Adaptive light control adapts the vehicle’s headlights to external lighting conditions. It changes the strength, direction, and rotation of the headlights depending on the vehicle’s environment and darkness.

 

4. Automatic Parking 

Automatic parking helps inform drivers of blind spots so they know when to turn the steering wheel and stop. Vehicles equipped with rearview cameras have a better view of their surroundings than traditional side mirrors. Some systems can even complete parking automatically without the driver’s help by combining the input of multiple sensors.

 

5. Autonomous Valet Parking

Autonomous valet parking is a new technology that works via vehicle sensor meshing, 5G network communication, with cloud services that manage autonomous vehicles in parking areas. The vehicles sensors provide the vehicle with information about where it is, where it needs to go, and how to get there safely. All this information is methodically evaluated and used to perform drive acceleration, braking, and steering until the vehicle is safely parked.

 

6. Navigation System

Car navigation systems provide on-screen instructions and voice prompts to help drivers follow a route while concentrating on the road. Some navigation systems can display exact traffic data and, if necessary, plan a new route to avoid traffic jams. Advanced systems may even offer Heads Up Displays (HuD) to reduce driver distraction.